Grub gear ender 3

Grub gear ender 3

I was having a lot of leveling issues with my original Ender 3 Pro bed. I ran Bed Level Visualizer, on my original bed with a BLTouch and found that the bed was severely dipped in the middle and just plain horrible.

So I bit the bullet and decided to upgrade my bed with this kit along with the silicone heating element. What a night and day difference! Bed was flatter and hardly any dips and just had to use a small tiny strip of a sticky note to get the whole bed within the same range, that's it.

I used stiff bed mounts, so this helped as well to get things stored and keep the same mesh for every print. I also paired this with the three point leveling carriage but didn't use the three points, instead I'm using 4 points.

Only reason why I used the Gulf coast carriage is due to being lighter than the stock carriage. Now all my prints stick and no more leveling issues! My temps are much more consistent using PID auto-tune. Just make sure to change your Marline code to use the correct thermal device! I've been using this for over a year and it works great. I don't know the correct M parameters for the thermister so I've been using.

Let me state first that I haven't used this part yet but I intend to. My initial observation is that the brass hex used to screw the thermister in place is larger than necessary thereby sinking heat away from the heat block and exposing the sinked heat to cooling air from the fan. I would also make it square rather than hex.

I didn't quite know what to expect, but once I got these dialed in, it was smooth sailing. Glad I made this purchase! In the description here you can clearly see that the stated working temperature is c. Clearly this is false advertising as defined by law. Don't lie about your products. Know what you're selling if this is an honest mistake, but I don't think it is.

Before installing this plate I was spending 1 to 2 hours trying to level the bed with sporadic success. I now love my Ender 3 but, unfortunately I'm now bald. Bought this to replace the glass bead thermistor, for the bead resistors kept breaking. Put this in, did a PID tune, and the heat curve was much smoother than any other glass bead thermistor. I highly recommend this as an upgrade. I've had my Ender 3 for about 3 years and this is by far the best upgrade I've done because it finally allows me to move beyond PLA.

I happened to find this product while searching for something else for my printer and I bought it on impulse along with a roll of PETG. I should have done this years ago! It's opened up a whole new world. This is a good, cheap, and easy upgrade and I recommend it highly for anyone owning an Ender 3.Home Grubs. A plastic grub or curly tail grub is a plastic fishing lure. Soft plastic curly tail grubs can carry a variety of shapes, colors and sizes, and are made from a variety of synthetic polymers.

Some are even scented to simulate live bait. Plastic grubs can be rigged on the line many different ways. Commonly they are used with a small fish hook and a split shot weight to keep the lure deeper in the water. The fishing equipment recommended is a 7 foot fishing rod with 8 to 10 lb fishing line. Our grub was first created in by my grandfather, and founder of Lockett Industries, Larry Lockett.

Over the course of 45 years, Lockett soft plastic grubs have become a premier name in the fishing tackle industry. Lockett curly tail grubs can be purchased in seven different sizes, and over 50 different colors. Our large variety of sizes and colors give fisherman the grubs they need for ice fishing, panfish, crappie, perch, trout, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass, sea bass, striper, musky, pike, halibut, and all other species.

We use a special formula for our 6 inch and 8 inch grubs that consists of saltwater grade soft plastic that will hold up against the bigger fish bite. All of our grubs are offered in bulk packages, and even bulk cases. When you buy curly tail grubs from Lockett Lures Outlet, you get a quality product, at a low price.James, Going through some old gear last month, I found my food supply lists and notes from I thought the old list might be of interest and the lessons I learned during the first three years in the remote Alaska bush may be helpful to a few of your readers.

I grew up in California listing to stories from my grandfather about Alaska and the Yukon. When I graduated from high school my grandfather gave me his remote trapping cabin in Alaska. At 18 I had a lot to learn and discovered many things the hard way.

I was lucky to survive the first year. He told me that the cabin was fully stocked with everything including food. Enough food and supplies for at least one winter. I had to promise the old Sourdough that I would have all of his traps flown back to town at the end of the trapping season or buy the traps from him. Before this the longest I had been in the wilderness was a 23 day Outward Bound survival class that I attended the year before and I had never spent a winter in a cold environment. To get to the trapping cabin it was at least a two week walk from the end of closest dirt road or a hour flight in a bush plane.

The pilot told me he could carry 1 passenger and lbs of supplies or a total of pounds of supplies and no passenger. I got out of the plane with a full back pack of gear, a duffel bag of supplies and a rifle. I had to walk a few miles to the cabin.

grub gear ender 3

I left the duffel bag in a tree to retrieve later. With a full back pack and my rifle I walked as fast as I could to the cabin. What a shock I had when I saw the cabin!

The old Trapper had lived many winters in the cabin and told me it was built strong. What I found was a small log shack with a dirt floor and sod roof.

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In the cabin a wood stove, a hand built bed frame and table. A old bed mattress suspended by wire from the rafters. There were traps, snow shoes, ax, bow saw, one man cross cut saw, files, a lantern and the other basics that are needed to survive the Alaska winter as a trapper. The trapper had not been to the cabin for four years. First lesson learned! If you count on food to be there when you need it, You better have had your food stored in a very secure way or you may go hungry.

The reality is I was too busy just trying to cut enough wood to stay warm and skin the marten, fox or wolf that I trapped or shot.

Letter Re: Grub and Gear–Lessons Learned from an Alaskan Trapper

I was cold, hungry and exhausted most of the time. I never had the time to get board. Being a green horn at trapping I only averaged 1 animal a week and it was usually shot instead of trapped.

As soon as I walked into the cabin I I knew I was in trouble. I did not have the 4-to-5 month supply of food I needed.We participate in the Amazon affiliate program and may earn a commission if you make a purchase through links on our site.

Extruder gear?

We also participate in other affiliate programs. Purchasing a 3D printer is not just a simple plug and play exercise. There are many issues that may crop up ranging from under or over extrusion to stringing related issues. Stringing is also known as oozing, hairy prints, or whiskers. This problem typically occurs when very small strings of filament plastic have been left behind in a 3D printed model. This is a more common issue with old machines rather than new ones. This is typically due to the filament plastic slowly oozing out of the main nozzle of the unit, even as the extruder is in the act of moving to a new location.

Not only can it leave an ungainly string protruding out of your printer, but it can also jam the nozzle if left unattended.

Ender-3 stepper motor dampers with press-fit pulleys! [SUB ITA]

Apart from that, it also gives a tacky and unseemly look to both the printer as well as the 3D object. Luckily there is plenty of information regarding this topic both online and offline. Let us take a quick look at the more common remedies to this problem. You can eliminate this problem, once and for all by following these few simple steps. However, it is incumbent to understand the issue of stringing 3D printing before you can try to resolve it.

Once this string solidifies it will stick to the printed parts. This, in a nutshell, is 3D print stringing. Once you are done with your print you will observe thin strands of plastic that might resemble strands of hair. The nozzle of your machine should never deposit filament strands while 3D printing as it travels over the print bed.

This does a hatchet job on your 3D printing job. PLA filament strands are prone to oozing. Often more than most other filament types out there. However, there exist plenty of solutions to this problem. When your Ender 3 Pro pulls the filament back during traveling, it will automatically take off most of the pressure from the nozzle.

This is precisely why many if not most 3D slicer software tends to have advanced retraction settings. Retraction distance is widely considered by most experts to be the single most critical retraction setting available in the Ender 3 series. It is possible to access it via Ender 3 Cura settings. It will determine how far the filament will travel over the print surface.

As a general rule, the further the nozzle can retract, the less likely will you be able to encounter 3D printer oozing.The upgrade was performed on a CR that required no modification. Why not upgrade them as I build right out of the box? Not so much. For the Y-Axis, you have to cut the hotbed carrier. Another view. Clamp em to the table and give em a grind.

Maker Steve marks carrier. Maker Steve removes carrier by loosening the four button screws on either side. And the belts holding the carrier. Clamp it down. Eye up the mark. DeWalt it. Looks good. Flip and grind. Test it, motor is cleared.

Ender 3 Stringing Issues: How to solve and slicer settings

Re-attach belt. So if you made it this far, you are willing to do what it takes to install the Vibration Damper on the Y-axis. So lets do that…. Remove the existing Y-Axis Motor. Grab your Metric Button Head Assortment.

Dig out two M3x6mm screws. Mount the vibration damper to the motor. Adjust the belt pulley so it is out past the vibration damper. There are four, remove all of the screws.

Pull all four screws on the motor. Install a Vibration Damper as shown. Adust your Belt Pully out the same distance as a Vibration Damper. There is a ton of other useful stuff on Makersteve. Support me and my 3D printing and Makersteve. Good tutorial. I personally used option 1 and it worked very well. I did consider that option but it does lose you some bed space. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam.

Learn how your comment data is processed. Skip to content. Like this: Like Loading Michael, I did consider that option but it does lose you some bed space. Thanks for the feedback. Steve Loading Leave a Reply Cancel reply.By using our site, you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Cookie PolicyPrivacy Policyand our Terms of Service. It only takes a minute to sign up. I run quite a few Ender 3 Pro's using the same slicer settings Simplify3Dand just recently I have noticed a very odd extrusion problem.

I find that at about the same height on several printers the printer under extrudes by quite a margin.

After that, it either continues to under extrude for the rest of the print or it will go back to extruding proper amounts of filament with no problem. This destroys the print and makes it both structurally weak and defective. I am wasting quite a bit of PLA trying to fix this problem so any help would be appreciated.

grub gear ender 3

I tried extruding the filament with a very hot temp C there were no problems here and the filament extruded fine albeit, it was not on the bed, just extruding into the air to see if the problem was heat. I tried the same thing as above but with a low temp this also proved just fine again extruding in the air.

That's about it. Not sure where to go from here so if anyone out there can think of anything I missed, I would love to hear it! I have also attached a picture of one example of this kind of failure below. I would also like to mention that this is happening on several of these printers as I have 18 printers running in one room. Our current theory is that the power draw is simply too high and so the printers are not getting the heat they need, however, the thermistors still register a solid C on my printers that are currently running.

EDIT 2: Here is another picture of a different model with the same layer failure problem but at a lower layer height. This model was printed along with 11 other identical models on the same bed, all of which failed at the same height. I haven't experienced any such problem myself, even after applying some fairly serious abuse to that part of my Ender 3, but this video from CHEP claims it was the source of his problems and explains the issue well.

I believe my Ender 3 came with an extra replacement for this coupler; if yours did, and this seems to be the problem, you can see if the second one they supplied is better.

grub gear ender 3

Otherwise it's an easy component to source third-party replacements for. Based on the image and your report that the problem consistently appears at the same part of the print, this is clearly an either absolute or net underextrusion problem, but mostly localized to particular layers. Either of these could be related to geometry of the layers involved. One factor here is probably coasting, which you mentioned in a comment you have enabled.

The small amount of coasting probably means it's not a big factor, but coasting always underextrudes. That's fundamentally how it works. You should not need coasting unless you've disabled retraction for some reason; it's a hack that's a poor substitute for part of what linear advance does on printers that support it. If you try to print faster than the hotend can keep up with, the material won't melt sufficiently fast to pass through the nozzle orifice.

This will naturally slow it down allowing further melting to take place, but in the mean time the extruder gear will either grind into the filament or much less likely, I think the motor will skip steps. Note that print speed settings control maximum speedwhich is why you won't necessarily hit problems from having them too high right away, but only at particular layers. Part of why I mention this is that, if you're trying to keep print time under control, setting a higher max speed might not even help you.James, Going through some old gear last month, I found my food supply lists and notes from I thought the old list might be of interest and the lessons I learned during the first three years in the remote Alaska bush may be helpful to a few of your readers.

I grew up in California listing to stories from my grandfather about Alaska and the Yukon. When I graduated from high school my grandfather gave me his remote trapping cabin in Alaska. At 18 I had a lot to learn and discovered many things the hard way. I was lucky to survive the first year. He told me that the cabin was fully stocked with everything including food. Enough food and supplies for at least one winter.

I had to promise the old Sourdough that I would have all of his traps flown back to town at the end of the trapping season or buy the traps from him. Before this the longest I had been in the wilderness was a 23 day Outward Bound survival class that I attended the year before and I had never spent a winter in a cold environment. To get to the trapping cabin it was at least a two week walk from the end of closest dirt road or a hour flight in a bush plane.

The pilot told me he could carry 1 passenger and lbs of supplies or a total of pounds of supplies and no passenger. I got out of the plane with a full back pack of gear, a duffel bag of supplies and a rifle. I had to walk a few miles to the cabin. I left the duffel bag in a tree to retrieve later. With a full back pack and my rifle I walked as fast as I could to the cabin. What a shock I had when I saw the cabin! The old Trapper had lived many winters in the cabin and told me it was built strong.

What I found was a small log shack with a dirt floor and sod roof. In the cabin a wood stove, a hand built bed frame and table. A old bed mattress suspended by wire from the rafters. There were traps, snow shoes, ax, bow saw, one man cross cut saw, files, a lantern and the other basics that are needed to survive the Alaska winter as a trapper. The trapper had not been to the cabin for four years. First lesson learned! If you count on food to be there when you need it, You better have had your food stored in a very secure way or you may go hungry.

The reality is I was too busy just trying to cut enough wood to stay warm and skin the marten, fox or wolf that I trapped or shot. I was cold, hungry and exhausted most of the time. I never had the time to get board. Being a green horn at trapping I only averaged 1 animal a week and it was usually shot instead of trapped. As soon as I walked into the cabin I I knew I was in trouble. I did not have the 4-to-5 month supply of food I needed. I had a topo map of the trapping area only but did not have the maps to get me back to the road or town, Second lesson!

Make your Egress plans ahead of time and have at least 2 good contingency plans. Thankfully in the cabin there were two steel drums with snap ring lids that were full of dry goods and on the shelves were some cans of dried goods that were also still good. The following list is what was still edible in the cabin as best as I can remember. The supplies along with a young moose I shot did keep me alive but it was no fun.

I had youth and enthusiasm on my side and knew the situation was temporary. I had in my pack 1 roll of toilet paper but there was none at the cabin. Third Lesson!


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